2019 w 30 Monday

Rose Cardigan. Picture taken by 8 year old. It is what it is.

Perhaps I was being a little hard on myself last time I wrote here. I’ve since worn my Rose cardigan a few (many) more times, and I discovered that a loose fitting cardigan can conceal or over emphasise a mistake. The longer front end is an inch longer, if that, and can easily be overcome by wearing it with some give at the back of the neck. I mean, have the back neck of the cardigan loosely at the top of my shoulders, not tightly up against the back of my neck. If that makes sense. Plus, I use a shawl pin to keep it closed. I think it fits great, though the breezy open style means that it can’t wear it open without it falling off. The end result was definitely worth all the knitting on those repetitive pieces.

Vertices Unite Baby Blanket

I also finished a thing! Stephen West’s Baby Vertices Unite Blanket. This was knit up with DK yarn, so it was a fast and fun project and actually a good size, not too big nor too small. The baby I knit this for isn’t here yet, so it wasn’t even a last minute up against the deadline thing. Yeah me!

End of sunset today

So, today the sunset was a lovely blend of peachy pinks and lavender with swirling clouds. But of course it all changed while I went inside to get my phone / camera. I’ve been finding time to work on Xanthe this week. My two year old just started daycare, so this project was hibernating a little bit because knitting lace with toddlers running around is no. Just no. I’m half way through the final lace panel, then there’s the picot bind off and I’m done!

Xanthe
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Dotted Rays

Project: Dotted Rays
Pattern: Dotted Rays by Stephen West
Yarn: BMFA STR Mediumweight in Feelin’ Groovy, BMFA STR Lightweight in Hobbit Garden and Fleece Artist Nova Wool in Forest
Needles: 4 mm
Yardage: 243 g / 612 yards

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This was a really fun knit, the simple garter stitch made it a really relaxing and enjoyable knit. The cheerful colours helped, too. I had to rip it out and start over after the first 2 wedges. I was just following the instructions, but I couldn’t ‘see’ where the instructions were taking me; usually when I read instructions I can see the results in my head, but not this time. The first two wedges were a little goofy so I frogged it and started over. This was my first time making an i-cord edged shawl, a little confusing a first but a beautiful, modern, and simple result. In the past three months, I’ve made 4 shawls and three of them had knitted-on edgings. I’ve finished two of those edgings (Celestarium and Aestlight) but I’m still plodding through my third (Hansel). One thing I noticed when knitting this shawl is yarn twist and what a difference it makes. All the yarns I used are sock yarns, the pinky/purple/yellow and the bluesy/purple yarns are BMFA, but the green that I knit the last wedge out of is Fleece Artist. The BMFA yarns have a high twist and the fabric is a lot more firm (but still soft!) than the drapey result I got from the lower twist Fleece Artist. I don’t mind the last wedge being drapey, I find it interesting. I think I would have been really bothered it was in the middle wedges. It almost makes an additional edging to the shawl.  The bold colours of my Dotted Rays are really going to get me through winter, I foresee a lot of use out of this comfy shawl.

Completed 12 July 2015

Vikings!

Completed 30 January 2015
Completed 30 January 2015

Project: Astrid the Viking

Pattern: Leif & Astrid

Yarn: Lett Lopi and Rowan Baby Alpaca DK

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I’d been planning to knit this doll for years, but I didn’t work up the courage until now. I’d always assumed that stuffies would be an incredibly fiddly and time consuming knit. It was actually quite straight forward and fun. I tried to use Lett Lopi odds and ends I had lying around since it’s Icelandic yarn from Icelandic wool. The only non-Icelandic yarn I used is for her skin, since the only pale pink I had in my stash was some leftover Rowan yarn from baby knitting. I used DPNs for the whole project, which surprised me a little because I usually give up on them about 1/3 of the way through any given project. They are just too fiddly for me. I can’t even use them for hexipuffs. Maybe it was because I had the project on three DPNs, rather than four as for socks or two as for hexipuffs. For whatever reason, DPNs absolutely work for me when I make stuffies. I will definitely make more, as my daughter is only four and even my 9 year-old son has asked me for Finn and Jake from Adventure Time.

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Sigil

Another sweater for my baby! I love the way Sigil turned out. Like every other Starmore sweater I’ve knit, this one will be loved and worn until I can’t fit over her head anymore.

The only trouble I had was with reverse st st pieces having to be sewn together. I can’t do it beautifully, so I try to make the ugly seam a design element of the sweater. Or I that’s what I tell myself. The collar is not rolling over the way I had hoped, despite my tinking back to add to extra rows when I saw it wasn’t quite perfect. I have just barely enough kureyon left to tack down the collar if necessary, but it would change the look and I want it to roll properly.

Now I have to finish the hat I’m working on, though I did cast on for an icelandic cardie in my post-FO excitement yesterday. And start my first shawl. Which is for a bride. At her wedding. Not nervous at all. I’ll be fine as long as my avoidance knitting stays simple. Everything. Will. Be. Just. Fine.

At long last, I’ll be talking about other projects soon

It’s done! The steek cutting went well, but Felted Tweed doesn’t steek as well as Lopi does. It’s too light and cobweb-y.

Middle-Earthscape 01

I’m really happy about the way it turned out, and the pattern for the sweater is incredible. It’s an amazing pattern for a generic cardigan, I could make this sweater over and over again, just changing the yoke patt to make it different from the last.

Middle-Earthscape 02

I’ve been knitting up a storm (for me, anyway), but I put the Sutton Hoo hat on the backburner because I found my husband’s missing hat from last year and my son doesn’t have a single knitted sweater that fits. I’m already nearly half-way through the Ryuu-ko sweater.

Middle-Earthscape 03

Oh, and happy (Canadian) Thanksgiving!

How to cut a steek. Or perhaps how not to cut a steek.

Cityscape: sleeves, yoke, collar, all done!! I thought I’d post some pictures showing how I plan to cut the steek. I’ve never had a problem with steeking, but all my experience with steeks involves lopi, which is a very sticky wool yarn. Felted Tweed is part merino, alpaca, and rayon, and the knit fabric is very light, so long story short I don’t want to cut the steek until after the buttonbands are complete.  The pictues below show the steek ready to be cut. I will cut the sweater along the orange yarn, gently pulling it out as I go. I sewed through the knit stitches on either side of the orange yarn, using yellow and blue. Once I cut the steek, I will sew the edges to the inside of the sweater, using sewing thread. Hopefully, I will have pictures of the completed cardie very soon!

cityscape yoke showing where steek is to be cut

Cityscape with steek ready to be cut

Sleevitis

At the moment, I’m working on Cityscape, a pattern by Laura Chau. I’m using Felted Tweed and I plan to rework the chart a little bit:

                   mordorscape

Do you see the depths of my nerdiness in the mods I made? It is LOTR related if you’re having trouble guessing.

But of course, I have to finish the sleeves to get to the yoke. I’m doing both at the same time and I’m halfway through, but they are still taking much, much too long to finish:

They are up to (but not including) the elbow. If I were a better photographer, that would be clear from the photo but sadly I’m not.